Category Archives: Curricular Activities

Visits and activities that are within the academic schedule.

Mural Walk

The Emerging Media students (CCM301) toured The Plateau and Mile End neighbourhoods of Montreal looking for murals and street art installations. They did not have to walk far from the Academic Center, the massive paint-covered walls are everywhere thanks to the yearly mural and graffiti festivals that takes place in this part of town. The students gathered photographic and video material with several pro digital cameras. This content will be used for their next challenge: creating a live VJ Set that will mix visual content to music.

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From Plate to Paper: Writing About Montreal Food

By Emmett Friedrichs (GDES ’20)

Although my journey throughout Montreal has only begun, my experience in my classes has been one to remember. Among all the classes offered here, the most interesting one that I am currently enrolled in would be the Food Writing class taught by the great Susan Semenak due to its abstract and surprising nature. As the name suggests, the class revolves around the exploration and history of food in the city of Montreal. This includes eating, discovering, and caring for new and local foods around the area, and writing stories and personal messages about how the experiences made us feel or how they connected with our personal lives.

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Writing the Game

By Megan Hoins (PWRT ’19)

When I first arrived at Champlain, I had the rare luck of knowing what I wanted to do for the rest of my life: write video games. I’m a senior now, and that goal remarkably hasn’t changed, even though I have discovered a love for screenwriting and poetry along the way.

There was only one class, then, that I wanted to take on my first day of freshman year, and now I’m finally getting the chance to take it: Interactive Storytelling. I was a bit worried walking into my first class since I’d been looking forward to this for four years, but I didn’t need to worry. Over the course of this first month, I’ve already learned a lot, and I’m starting to find that I really do love game writing.

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Emerging Media in Montreal

By Abigail Scott (MRKT ’20)

I chose Marketing as my major because I felt it was the best of both worlds; I could remain creative while also having a wide variety of career paths. Unfortunately, on the path to having a creative career, I feel like there have been a lot of classes that I really struggle to get through. Don’t get me wrong, I understand the importance of accounting, it’s just not something I easily can grasp. That’s why when choosing my classes for this semester in Montreal I really wanted to take advantage of the creative atmosphere of the city. I immediately knew that I wanted to take Emerging Media in Montreal. I wasn’t exactly sure of what the class entailed but I knew that the Marketing sphere is always adapting to new technology and media so I thought it would fit perfectly with my major. Previously, I had taken the Digital Marketing class for my minor. We had briefly talked about virtual reality and voice search as new platforms for marketing. Having very little experience with virtual reality I thought it would be beneficial to take a class that would introduce me to this and other media that could be crucial to my future career.

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A College Student’s Guide To Chinatown – Rian Atherton

By Rian Atherton (California Lutheran University ’18)

In order to talk about Chinatown, you have to first delve into the History and the customs of the people living there. Now you don’t have to be an expert on Chinatown but you should at least familiarize yourself with some of these basics. One of the most important things you need to realize if you are visiting Chinatown is that everything here is a bit different. Like all immigrant areas, the people here have brought some of their customs and traditions from overseas. First and foremost of these is that the elderly take priority sometimes you may be in a shop and you may be first and an old Chinese man or woman will walk in and a slew of rapid-fire Cantonese will fire out faster than a bullet train. Don’t be offended but you are no longer the priority, it has nothing to do with you and everything to do with the fact that they probably have known each other for decades and the Chinese have a deference for the elderly that western countries lack.  That being said, it is worth the wait because the food in Chinatown is absolutely divine.

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The Internship Chronicles – Ryan Place

By Ryan Place (GDES ’19)

I worked at Tuque Games, a small game development studio situated in Montreal. Tuque is just coming off the heels of releasing their first original game, Livelock back in 2016. With the success of Livelock, the team has decided to amp up production and dive into a much more ambitious and exciting new unannounced project.

During my time with Tuque I worked under the Lead Designer Kevin Neibert and the rest of the design team on their latest unannounced project. The majority of the work I did for the team dealt primarily with player experience. In the early days of my internship I was mostly on bug testing duty while I familiarized myself with the game and its mechanics. Over time my role shifted away from specifically bug testing and more toward player experience design (though with a bit of bug testing). Continue reading

The Internship Chronicles – Cyrus Burris

By Cyrus Burris (GPMG ’19)

During the Spring semester of my junior year in Montreal, I was afforded the opportunity to serve as a Production Intern at a game studio called LuckyHammers. LuckyHammers was originally founded in 2004 as a company called “Fidel,” but eventually rebranded to the current name after being acquired by the Stolo holding company. Throughout its existence, LuckyHammers has worked with many different relevant brands and properties, but has more recently focused on VR projects, and digital versions of tabletop games for PC and mobile. Continue reading

The Internship Chronicles – Calum Phillips

By Calum Phillips (EGPR ’19)

I spent two semesters in Montreal, and staying here was was a great choice. I got to go on more company visits, get taught by a Ubisoft employee, and more relevantly, I got to take another internship. This semester I got to work at a company called Pixelz, on a game titled Cefore, a demolition puzzle game (that’s also available now on Steam Early Access). My main function for most of the internship was creating a system that records GIFs of gameplay and gives the user the ability to upload them to Imgur and share them on Reddit and Twitter. Continue reading

Montreal: Further Abroad Than You Think

By Anna Bilotta (PSYCH ’20)

Summer Program Participants (l-r) Kenya Cummins & Julia Lenoard in Old Montreal

I had always wanted to study abroad, so when I got the opportunity to attend Champlain College’s Montreal Summer Culture Program I immediately took the chance. I had traveled many times to cities both in and outside the United States before; I had even traveled to Montreal in the past for weekend trips. I always thought that Montreal was similar to other major North American cities. But after living in the city for over a month, my opinion of the city has changed; Montreal does not fall into the typical mold of the US or Canadian city. Its bilingualism and mix of cultures offers residents and visitors a one-of-a-kind living situation. Anyone who tells you that Montreal is more similar to the United States than different is wrong, but you can only learn that from spending a good amount of time here. Montreal is a valid and excellent study abroad option; you get to experience a different language being spoken around you while being in a truly foreign place. The culture of Montreal, and Canada in general, is also unique because there is not an emphasis on assimilation of “different” groups; each ethnicity found here is fully represented, whether that be through food or art. Continue reading

A Student’s Guide to Chinatown

By Rian Atherton (California Lutheran University ’18)

In order to talk about Chinatown you have to first delve into the History and the customs of the people living there. Now you don’t have to be an expert on Chinatown but you should at least familiarize yourself with some of these basics. One of the most important things you need to realize if you are visiting Chinatown is that everything here is a bit different. Like all immigrant areas the people here have brought some of their customs and traditions from overseas. First and foremost of these is that the elderly take priority sometimes you may be in a shop and you may be first and an old Chinese man or woman will walk in and a slew of rapid fire Cantonese will fire out faster than a bullet train. Don’t be offended but you are no longer the priority, it has nothing to do with you and everything to do with the fact that they probably have known each other for decades and the Chinese have a deference for the elderly that western countries lack.  That being said, it is worth the wait because the food in Chinatown is absolutely divine.

Continue reading