Category Archives: Food

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Adventures in Food Writing: Montreal

Alex Theodoreu (Game Art ’21) shows us what the students get up to in the Food Writing class in Montreal. Click on the video link to find out more!

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Adjusting to life in Montreal

By Alexandra Theodoreu (Game Art ’21)

While humans are adaptive creatures, being thrown into a new environment is never easy. I’ve moved a lot and lived in a lot of places, but I’ve never lived in a big city like Montreal. It took a little time to adjust, but so far I’ve been loving it here.

Hearing different languages everywhere you go is one of my favorite parts of being here. Sometimes you hear a different language or two back in Burlington, but definitely not everyday. Here, you hop on the Metro and every station name is spoken in French. And you don’t just hear French either, it goes from from hearing Italian at Jean Talon Market to Chinese at the Bakery that my friends and I frequent for lunch in Chinatown. Continue reading

Hungry Travelers: We Eat It, You Read It

Leanna Russell (GART ’20) and Grace Magnant (GART ’20) adventured through the streets of Montreal during their Fall 2018 semester reviewing local restaurants all while staying within the average college student’s budget. While on these adventures, they discovered everything from juicy dumplings to affordable cocktails.

For more on their discoveries and food reviews, check out their website!

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Zach’s 5 In 10 Under 15

Check out Zach Phillips’s (GDES’20) final project for Food Writing! Zach ventured around Montreal on a mission to find his “5 lunch spots within a 10 minute walk of either EVO Montreal or the Academic Center for under $15” CAD! After trying 15+ various lunch spots, he narrowed down his favorites and wrote a little review for each. Here are the results:

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Megan Says Goodbye

By Megan Hoins (PWRT ’19)

I’m going to be honest: I really didn’t think Montreal would have a huge impact on me. I just figured it would be another semester, albeit with a lot of new, fun experiences in a totally new place.

That didn’t happen. If anything, this semester had the most impact on me out of any I’ve had at Champlain, since it allowed me to get to know myself for, really, the first time in my life.

Going abroad meant depending on myself, in a lot of ways: making my own food, commuting to work, and living apart from the big college community I was used to. It also meant spending a lot of time by myself, which, as a social introvert, sounded perfectly ideal to me. Continue reading

Abby’s Final Thoughts

By Abby Scott (MRKT ’20)

When I crossed the bridge into Montreal back in August it suddenly hit me that this is where I would be until December. I have previously worked at an overnight summer camp that would keep me away from home for two months during the summer, but somehow I was still a little apprehensive about being away from everything that was familiar for so long. It had been easy for me to say that Burlington was only an hour or so away so Montreal wouldn’t be too different until I arrived. The first week here I quickly realized that I was going to be living in a city with it’s own rich and unique culture. Almost immediately, I fell in love with the city and those who formed its unique culture.

I have deeply rooted faith that purposefully placing yourself outside of your comfort zone creates an environment that nurtures growth. If we were comfortable all the time, we would never test our limits and see what we are truly capable of. During my time in Montreal, there were definitely challenges that pushed me out of my comfort zone. For me, speaking French is something that makes me wildly uncomfortable. I studied French for three years in high school and picked it up again this semester. I can read quite a few things and understand when someone speaks to me. However, speaking was always difficult because I felt I would look dense or say something wrong. Continue reading

City Flavours

By Megan Hoins (PWRT ’19)

When I initially came to Montreal, I was a bit wary of the supposed “lack” of student activities. There wouldn’t be any clubs up here, and I thought because of that, there wouldn’t be as many events to go to. Where were the volunteer sessions? The trips downtown? The free food???

Lucky for me, I was immediately proven wrong. Champlain Montreal constantly has activities going on and (even luckier for me) tons of those activities involve free food. Continue reading

From Plate to Paper: Writing About Montreal Food

By Emmett Friedrichs (GDES ’20)

Although my journey throughout Montreal has only begun, my experience in my classes has been one to remember. Among all the classes offered here, the most interesting one that I am currently enrolled in would be the Food Writing class taught by the great Susan Semenak due to its abstract and surprising nature. As the name suggests, the class revolves around the exploration and history of food in the city of Montreal. This includes eating, discovering, and caring for new and local foods around the area, and writing stories and personal messages about how the experiences made us feel or how they connected with our personal lives.

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A College Student’s Guide To Chinatown – Rian Atherton

By Rian Atherton (California Lutheran University ’18)

In order to talk about Chinatown, you have to first delve into the History and the customs of the people living there. Now you don’t have to be an expert on Chinatown but you should at least familiarize yourself with some of these basics. One of the most important things you need to realize if you are visiting Chinatown is that everything here is a bit different. Like all immigrant areas, the people here have brought some of their customs and traditions from overseas. First and foremost of these is that the elderly take priority sometimes you may be in a shop and you may be first and an old Chinese man or woman will walk in and a slew of rapid-fire Cantonese will fire out faster than a bullet train. Don’t be offended but you are no longer the priority, it has nothing to do with you and everything to do with the fact that they probably have known each other for decades and the Chinese have a deference for the elderly that western countries lack. That being said, it is worth the wait because the food in Chinatown is absolutely divine.

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Montreal: Further Abroad Than You Think

By Anna Bilotta (PSYCH ’20)

Summer Program Participants (l-r) Kenya Cummins & Julia Lenoard in Old Montreal

I had always wanted to study abroad, so when I got the opportunity to attend Champlain College’s Montreal Summer Culture Program I immediately took the chance. I had traveled many times to cities both in and outside the United States before; I had even traveled to Montreal in the past for weekend trips. I always thought that Montreal was similar to other major North American cities. But after living in the city for over a month, my opinion of the city has changed; Montreal does not fall into the typical mold of the US or Canadian city. Its bilingualism and mix of cultures offers residents and visitors a one-of-a-kind living situation. Anyone who tells you that Montreal is more similar to the United States than different is wrong, but you can only learn that from spending a good amount of time here. Montreal is a valid and excellent study abroad option; you get to experience a different language being spoken around you while being in a truly foreign place. The culture of Montreal, and Canada in general, is also unique because there is not an emphasis on assimilation of “different” groups; each ethnicity found here is fully represented, whether that be through food or art. Continue reading