Category Archives: Montreal Events & Landmarks

A Certain Vintage

By Amanda Gates (GDES ’19)

It’s to no one’s surprise that college students tend to run short of cash. The hunt for the cheapest deals is an ongoing personal battle during every hour of the day. The most important survival factor is of course, food, but clothing comes in as a close second. In a city where fashion is so prevalent, how and where can students keep up?

Thrift is a great answer to a lot of problems. Need something cheap or want something unique? Perfect. Need to get out of your room or go on a new adventure? Also a good choice. A glance at the past isn’t always for the museums and Montreal provides great opportunities to find it elsewhere. Throughout the year, Montreal hosts a variety of different thrift events all across the city. No one sale is the same, and better yet, every find is unique. Tons of people have found crazy items and insane brand deals at the cost of almost nothing. So, it was my time to find something of my own! Continue reading

Tunnel Vision – The Underground City

By Amanda Gates (GDES ’19)

Have you ever felt like exploring beneath the city streets? To your luck, the entrance to one of Montreal’s very own Narnia’s is right at your fingertips. For what feels like miles throughout the downtown core, a series of malls and tunnels connect the above to the below. The adventures and discoveries double with the existence of this underground city, and while sometimes difficult to find and navigate around, the easiest first step to get there begins at the McGill metro station. Continue reading

A Day in Virtual Space

By Matt Nesteroff (CREM ’19)

Earlier in the week my Emerging Media in Montreal (CCM 301) class was lucky to visit the Rio Tinto Alcan Planetarium at Montreal’s Olympic Park just a short walk from the Viau metro station. We watched two shows: Space Next documented the past and predicted the future of space exploration, and EXO tracked humanity’s search for other forms of life in the galaxy.

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Summer (Programs) In The City!

By Ryan Hipgrave (Assistant Director, Montreal Campus)

Ask any Montrealer, and they’ll tell you that the best time to be in this city is the summer. During those sunny months, the streets of North America’s largest French-speaking metropolis pulsate with the vibes of festivals, concerts, outdoor restaurants, and the millions of tourists flitting about our many antique cobblestone roads.

Given all that is exciting about Montreal in the summertime, it makes perfect sense that Champlain College would offer two different, immersive study abroad opportunities in the capital of French-Canadian identity. From May 25th to June 30th, 2018, students are invited to descend on Champlain’s Montreal Campus to participate in one of two exceptional for-credit programs! Through both the Summer Culture and Summer Filmmaking programs, students will engage with the city on meaningful levels as they focus their projects on the unfamiliar territory in which they find themselves.  Continue reading

Getting In The Game

By Kyle Mays (Multimedia – California Lutheran ’18)

Attending the DemoNight was a fascinating experience, mainly because I didn’t really know what to expect. I’ve never attended any sort of developer event like this before, and upon entering the show-floor I was hit with a wave of familiarity from convention parties I had attended in the past back home in California. I wasn’t expecting a stuffy, no-nonsense environment for a night of game demo presentations, but I guess I was not expecting it to be as casual and energetic so it was one of a number of pleasant surprises had that night!

Having not a whole lot of hard-asset skills and very little experience in the field of game-making I found it hard to squeeze into conversations myself, but it was refreshing to see how social the community truly is. Being able to grab a drink from the bar and just talk about aspects of the industry and personal projects with the level of enthusiasm and joy I saw in myriad developers dispersed all throughout the giant room was really invigorating. It felt thrilling just to be there!

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Ready, Set, Canada!

By Amanda Gates (GDES ’19)

The sun was just rising, the car packed like Tetris, and Montreal, Canada written into Waze on the dashboard from Concord, Massachusetts. The whole family was stuffed into the handy dandy Buick SUV, papers ready and a plan set. Our dog Pepper content in his bed on my brother’s lap, and our cat left at home as the king of the house for the weekend. It felt like vacation, yet it wasn’t. Nerves tangled and butterflies wild, I was excited, but absolutely terrified. Three hours later we were in Vermont, dropping my brother’s luggage off at McDonald Hall, and another hour later we crossed the border into Canada. They say the biggest cultural difference in the shortest amount of time is the leap from Burlington, Vermont to Montreal, Quebec, and they’re not wrong. It was little city to mini New York (with a bit of Paris thrown in for good measure).

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Creepy Crawlers at the Insectarium

By Josh Walker (GART ’19)

Let me just open this blog post in a very honest way – I am a huge baby when it comes to insects. They are really small but absolutely horrifying, they have skeletons on the outside of their bodies, and some have more legs than I have fingers which is the most horrifying thing in the world. Whenever I see a bug or have an unfortunate interaction with one, I’m paranoid for the next five minutes about what may be crawling on me that I’m unaware of. When I volunteered for this blog post, I figured I could give myself a reason to enjoy what otherwise would be a very neutral experience for me, but what I found is that I didn’t really need an excuse, the experience was quite interesting.

After our SCI 155 class departed from the metro station and arrived at the Insectarium, which was a much smaller building than I expected. I remember thinking that there wouldn’t be many bugs on display because of lack of space, but then I promptly remembered how small bugs are. Once we were inside, I saw the corny graphics on the wall of their stick bug mascot, there to inform us about the wonders of insectoid life. There was a large dome-like room with stairs descending down to the displays. The factoids on the wall were interesting with some good nuggets of information about what certain bugs eat, how they defend themselves, adaptations they may develop depending on their environment, but I’m a visual learner. The wall graphics weren’t nearly as interesting as the legions of mostly dead insects in glass cases, all staring at me with their wicked eyes and antennae.

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The Internship Chronicles – Jackie

Jackie Therrien (History major ’18) from Stonehill University tells us about her experience at the Museum of Jewish Montreal. 

This fall semester, I had the wonderful experience of interning at the Museum of Jewish Montreal in the historic Mile End neighborhood. The Museum of Jewish Montreal is a not-for-profit organization that collects, maps, and shares the history and experiences of the Montreal Jewish community online and through walking tours, exhibits, and other public programming. MJM seeks to ensure the legacy of Jewish life in Montreal by educating the public and giving visitors new ways to interact with the city’s Jewish past and present.

Founded in 2010, the Museum’s activities include walking tours of historic Jewish neighbourhoods, online exhibits, oral history collection, lectures, workshops and pop-up exhibitions. The museum went from virtual to physical in 2016, and this major change has permitted the museum to better preserve and celebrate the history of Jewish Montreal and to have a permanent exhibition space, office, and meeting place instead of cafes and homes of those who started the museum. The space is a bright and airy loft-like storefront with 80 feet of windows, on the main floor of 4040 St-Laurent Blvd. at Duluth Ave., an eight-story building erected in 1912 by manufacturer Abraham M. Vineberg. It housed garment factories for many years, when the needle trade was an integral component of the neighbourhood’s bustling Jewish community. Continue reading

Walls of Green

By Nicholas Oprisu (GPRO ’19)

Environmental change is a “big” issue, in the sense that it’s something too expansive for me as an individual to influence or change. It’s important, yes, but how is a single person supposed to influence this issue? Do the efforts of little each person really count?

With that in mind, I went with my Environmental Science in Montreal (SCI 155) class to the Concordia Greenhouse, a collectively run and consensus-based nonprofit organization. Their main goal is to promote sustainable horticulture and education through workshops, open exhibits, and a welcoming atmosphere created by the horticulture. They allow other groups to use their space for the purpose of displaying or experimenting with new techniques of growing, adding to the educational diversity it has. The greenhouse itself holds dedicated growing rooms or communal spaces, where more plants can grow in a less controlled environment. The dedicated rooms either held projects by the greenhouse or those who rented it out and growing rooms for specific plants. They are a promoter of the idea of urban agriculture, which is the idea that the urban landscape can work with sustainable growing methods to maximize the usefulness and value of space in cities through rooftop gardens and other urban agricultural solutions, such as smaller-scale greenhouses.

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Garden of Delights

By Elisabeth Hammond (PWRT ’19)

After an unexpected heatwave that rivaled Florida, the weather finally cooled off enough to enjoy fully the outdoors. Without the boiling heat, a Friday trip to the Botanical Garden’s annual Garden of Lights was actually something to look forward to. While I’ve been to the famous Garden many times, I had never been there when the light festival was held. Needless to say, already a fan of the Garden, the event was something I anticipated.

The breeze was cool and the metro bearable as the group made their way from the academic center to the Garden with a noticeable mass of others. Many people streamed from the sidewalks and joined together on the walk to the gardens, and excitement that many felt could be shared by everyone.

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