Tag Archives: professional development

The Internship Chronicles – Nick

Nick Magnus (Game Design ’19) tells us about his experience interning at Edoki Academy during his semester in Montreal.

Over the course of this Fall semester, I interned as a Game Designer at a small company called Edoki Academy. Founded in 2010, Edoki Academy specializes in Educational Apps for children. The company has been releasing apps for the iPad since its release and has been supporting many of them with new updates periodically. There are less than 15 employees, so It is very easy to know everyone.

The company is housed in an office structure 10 minutes from the Mont-Royal station, which offers a variety of choices for morning coffee. The office space, which has just recently moved, consists of a single open space with 10 computers, with offices for the directors. My mentor, Léa Tabary, delegated most of my tasks to me as well as provided feedback on my work. Continue reading

The Internship Chronicles – Nick

Nick Oprisu (Game Production ’19) tells us about his internship at Illogika during his semester abroad in Montreal.

There is a good deal of discussion and debate about what a game “producer” does. Is it mainly business tasks like budgeting and marketing, or is it more project management role? Is it an equal mix of both, or is it something else? This uncertainty is partially why I was drawn to this type of work. Self determination and independence are traits I value highly in people and companies, and the chance to forge my own mark on this new profession is a welcome opportunity. While we can debate the role of them, producers are key to managing even small teams and making sure a game goes from an idea to a product, and a successful one at that. The successful producers figure out this balance fast and adapt their style and work methodology to the team they have. This tightrope walk of managing the product and managing the business is what separates the bad producers from the good ones, and understanding when their current model is failing separates the good from the great. Continue reading