Tag Archives: Study abroad

A MEGA (Montreal Electronic Game Arcade) Weekend

Image from http://mega-mtl.com/#welcome

Alex Dalton (Game Producer ’19) had the opportunity to attend MEGA as part of his internship. Alex tells us all about the event.

When you first look at Montreal, you would probably see the vibrant history of the city. If you look carefully you would be able to see the thriving technology scene. From Place des Arts to Centre Phi, tech is everywhere. The game industry is thriving in Montreal. A number of students, myself included, have managed to land internships within the game industry. When I was seventeen, I wanted to be where I am right now. I work as a production intern for an indie studio in Montreal. The internship has been great and towards the end of the internship, I was given the opportunity to go to MEGA. MEGA or Montreal Electronic Game Arcade was an event similar to the concept of Penny Arcade Expo. MEGA was meant for developers to show off their projects and receive feedback. I had a good time. Continue reading

 New Frontier: The Story of a Stonehill College Computer Science Student Exploring Game Development in Montreal

By Michael Middleton (Computer Science ’18, Stonehill College).

Michael Middleton `18 sitting in front of a wall displaying some of Edoki Academy’s games.

         Who Is He?

    My name is Michael Middleton and I’m a senior at Stonehill College studying       Computer Science and German. I’m studying abroad this semester with   Champlain College of Vermont at its Montreal Campus. From the moment I   started taking Computer Science classes, I’ve always wanted to try making video games. I also wanted to study abroad and practice my French, so when the Office of International Programs mentioned the Montreal opportunity my response was a rapid and excited “sign me up!”

       Working at Edoki Academy

I was granted the chance to interview and accept a position at Edoki Academy beginning this past September. Originally founded as Seven Academy in 2012, the company merged with Edoki Inc. founded in 2010 to form today’s existing company. Headed by Mr. Emmanuel Guyot, the company strives to create interactive mobile applications and games for kids aged 3 – 10 utilizing Montessori Education Method. Developed in the late 19th/early 20th century by Dr. Maria Montessori, the Montessori Education Method attempts to teach children through self-discovery and interactive learning rather than the traditional directed instruction. (To learn about more about Ms. Montessori, click here.) Continue reading

The Internship Chronicles – Nick

Nick Magnus (Game Design ’19) tells us about his experience interning at Edoki Academy during his semester in Montreal.

Over the course of this Fall semester, I interned as a Game Designer at a small company called Edoki Academy. Founded in 2010, Edoki Academy specializes in Educational Apps for children. The company has been releasing apps for the iPad since its release and has been supporting many of them with new updates periodically. There are less than 15 employees, so It is very easy to know everyone.

The company is housed in an office structure 10 minutes from the Mont-Royal station, which offers a variety of choices for morning coffee. The office space, which has just recently moved, consists of a single open space with 10 computers, with offices for the directors. My mentor, Léa Tabary, delegated most of my tasks to me as well as provided feedback on my work. Continue reading

The Internship Chronicles – Alex

Alex Dalton (Game Production ’19) tells us about his internship at indie studio, Back to the Game, during his semester abroad in Montreal. Alex also had the opportunity to table the game he was working on at MEGA and MIGS.

When a student comes to Champlain College, what do you think they came here for? For many, it was the opportunity for a higher education. For me, it was all about the internship opportunity. Champlain College offered a number of connections that I could use to break into the highly competitive game industry. Upon arriving in Montreal I was thrilled to be starting my internship. Unfortunately for me, I did not find one for a few weeks but when I did, I hit the jackpot. I landed an internship at Back to the Game. Back to the Game or B2TG was founded by my boss Richard Rispoli, three months before I came around. The team was small, consisting of industry veterans. Richard worked in the game industry for fifteen years prior working on platforms ranging from PC to the Nintendo DS. Our lead programmer Ivan has been working with Richard for quite some time and I have become quite in awe of his programming skills. Back to the Game’s lead artist Michael is a quite and talented soul. Michael has worked on some great projects like Disney’s Zootopia and I have been honored to work with him. The same goes for everyone at Back to the Game. I could not be the producer I am today without the continued guidance of Richard.      Continue reading

Creepy Crawlers at the Insectarium

By Josh Walker (GART ’19)

Let me just open this blog post in a very honest way – I am a huge baby when it comes to insects. They are really small but absolutely horrifying, they have skeletons on the outside of their bodies, and some have more legs than I have fingers which is the most horrifying thing in the world. Whenever I see a bug or have an unfortunate interaction with one, I’m paranoid for the next five minutes about what may be crawling on me that I’m unaware of. When I volunteered for this blog post, I figured I could give myself a reason to enjoy what otherwise would be a very neutral experience for me, but what I found is that I didn’t really need an excuse, the experience was quite interesting.

After our SCI 155 class departed from the metro station and arrived at the Insectarium, which was a much smaller building than I expected. I remember thinking that there wouldn’t be many bugs on display because of lack of space, but then I promptly remembered how small bugs are. Once we were inside, I saw the corny graphics on the wall of their stick bug mascot, there to inform us about the wonders of insectoid life. There was a large dome-like room with stairs descending down to the displays. The factoids on the wall were interesting with some good nuggets of information about what certain bugs eat, how they defend themselves, adaptations they may develop depending on their environment, but I’m a visual learner. The wall graphics weren’t nearly as interesting as the legions of mostly dead insects in glass cases, all staring at me with their wicked eyes and antennae.

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The Internship Chronicles – Jackie

Jackie Therrien (History major ’18) from Stonehill University tells us about her experience at the Museum of Jewish Montreal. 

This fall semester, I had the wonderful experience of interning at the Museum of Jewish Montreal in the historic Mile End neighborhood. The Museum of Jewish Montreal is a not-for-profit organization that collects, maps, and shares the history and experiences of the Montreal Jewish community online and through walking tours, exhibits, and other public programming. MJM seeks to ensure the legacy of Jewish life in Montreal by educating the public and giving visitors new ways to interact with the city’s Jewish past and present.

Founded in 2010, the Museum’s activities include walking tours of historic Jewish neighbourhoods, online exhibits, oral history collection, lectures, workshops and pop-up exhibitions. The museum went from virtual to physical in 2016, and this major change has permitted the museum to better preserve and celebrate the history of Jewish Montreal and to have a permanent exhibition space, office, and meeting place instead of cafes and homes of those who started the museum. The space is a bright and airy loft-like storefront with 80 feet of windows, on the main floor of 4040 St-Laurent Blvd. at Duluth Ave., an eight-story building erected in 1912 by manufacturer Abraham M. Vineberg. It housed garment factories for many years, when the needle trade was an integral component of the neighbourhood’s bustling Jewish community. Continue reading

THE INTERNSHIP CHRONICLES – MAX

Max Sanel (Game Production’18) interned at Ironbelly Studios during the spring semester.

Ironbelly studios is a games company that offers services from 3d art, to level design, to programming as well as producing their own games. They have an office in Montreal where some of the members work, with the rest working remotely from all over the world. I’ve been interning there this semester, and it’s been an absolute blast. Continue reading

THE INTERNSHIP CHRONICLES: SUMMER EDITION – JAMES INTERNS AT BEHAVIOUR INTERACTIVE

This summer, James Keats (EGPR ’18) stayed in Montreal to do an internship at Behaviour Interactive after studying at the Champlain Abroad campus in the spring.

Having a full time summer internship in Montreal was an awesome experience, and very different from living and working there during a school semester (especially during the winter semester)! I was blown away by how much the city opens up and how truly alive everything becomes when the weather gets warmer. I was lucky enough to be staying during Montreal’s 375th anniversary, and so there were even more events!

Walls of Green

By Nicholas Oprisu (GPRO ’19)

Environmental change is a “big” issue, in the sense that it’s something too expansive for me as an individual to influence or change. It’s important, yes, but how is a single person supposed to influence this issue? Do the efforts of little each person really count?

With that in mind, I went with my Environmental Science in Montreal (SCI 155) class to the Concordia Greenhouse, a collectively run and consensus-based nonprofit organization. Their main goal is to promote sustainable horticulture and education through workshops, open exhibits, and a welcoming atmosphere created by the horticulture. They allow other groups to use their space for the purpose of displaying or experimenting with new techniques of growing, adding to the educational diversity it has. The greenhouse itself holds dedicated growing rooms or communal spaces, where more plants can grow in a less controlled environment. The dedicated rooms either held projects by the greenhouse or those who rented it out and growing rooms for specific plants. They are a promoter of the idea of urban agriculture, which is the idea that the urban landscape can work with sustainable growing methods to maximize the usefulness and value of space in cities through rooftop gardens and other urban agricultural solutions, such as smaller-scale greenhouses.

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Garden of Delights

By Elisabeth Hammond (PWRT ’19)

After an unexpected heatwave that rivaled Florida, the weather finally cooled off enough to enjoy fully the outdoors. Without the boiling heat, a Friday trip to the Botanical Garden’s annual Garden of Lights was actually something to look forward to. While I’ve been to the famous Garden many times, I had never been there when the light festival was held. Needless to say, already a fan of the Garden, the event was something I anticipated.

The breeze was cool and the metro bearable as the group made their way from the academic center to the Garden with a noticeable mass of others. Many people streamed from the sidewalks and joined together on the walk to the gardens, and excitement that many felt could be shared by everyone.

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